Tag: Alzheimer’s disease Philadelphia

Angela scheduled to be keynote speaker for “Remembering Those Who Forget”

We are excited to announce that Angela will serve as the keynote speaker for the Presbyterian Older Adult Ministry (POAM) at the event, “Remembering Those Who Forget”.  Angela will talk about her decades of experience working with those living with dementia.  She will be sure to touch upon practical care approaches that can be implemented immediately, in addition to giving her clinical perspective on the disease.  The event is open to those wanting to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

We would appreciate registration prior to attending the event.  This event is scheduled for next Thursday, May 2, at 8:30am to 1pm in Plymouth Meeting.  Exact details can be found via this link: https://presbyphl.org/events/presby-older-adult-dementia-workhop/

How dementia care is different from traditional home care

Why work with a home care company that specializes in dementia care?

Most non-medical home care companies care for those living with dementia, but services are not equal among providers. There are over 80 types of known dementias and each present a unique set of challenges.

In addition, a client’s progression of dementia depends on their background, personality, and support system. No two clients are ever alike.
Even if a company develops a comprehensive plan of care that includes all of these components, they still need to ensure that the direct care team remains informed and is relatively stable. If either falter, so does the quality of care. Carepartners must remain in communication with one of our registered nurses or dementia coaches throughout the process. They communicate with one another through client care record sheets and a journal that symbolizes the development of their relationship with the client.

Carepartners undergo an educational seminar, role playing scenarios, and additional dementia training before ever assuming their first assignment with a client living with dementia. Additional training is provided for more challenging types of dementia.

NursePartners created the GEM division to care for those living with dementia. This is distinct from our traditional home care division. We put together a plan of care based on the client’s type of dementia, specific needs, background, personality, and support system. Each client is associated with a GEM stone, which indicates where they are in the progression of the disease.

At each stage, we alter our approaches for connecting and providing care. Verbal cues become less effective than visual and touch cues as the disease progresses. We also are aware of the client’s visual scope and in which directions it declines.

If you have questions about how your loved one could benefit from GEM care services, we are available 24/7 to take your call: 610-323-9800.

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Carl and Melva painting together on a cold winter day.

The GEMS™ brain change model

NursePartners embraces the GEMS™ brain change model developed by Teepa Snow.  Unlike other scales, such as the Global Deterioration Scale or the Dementia Severity Rating Scale, the GEMS focuses on creating constructive opportunities to engage with the person living with dementia.  Clients are still seen as people, rather than former individuals lost to the disease.

The GEMS allows us to adapt our care approaches to connect with the person in their moment.  We acknowledge what is lost, but use other senses to build meaningful relationships with our clients.

Services begin with a comprehensive assessment that goes beyond the clinical needs.  We want to know as much as possible about our clients’ preferences and personal histories.  This will allow us to connect from day one, building a durable and trusting relationship.   NursePartners changes the plans of care as we learn new information about each client.

All carepartners attend an initial orientation where they actively participate in a dementia workshop.  Carepartners learn the positive physical approach to care and contribute to a dialogue about the disease.  Dementia coaches then stimulate real life scenarios, filming each carepartner as they approach the hypothetical client.  Carepartners watch themselves as they approach clients, recognizing their strengths and acknowledge an area for improvement.  Scenarios are repeated until carepartners feel confident in the learned approaches.

Carepartners then complete a proprietary training module and final assessment, ensuring that they have understood the training.  At this point, they are ready to be assigned to a client living with dementia.  NursePartners admin will then assess if a client and carepartner would be a good match based on their personalities, interests, and general disposition.

All families are given a description of the GEMS model.  We want them to also connect with their loved one, continuing their relationships.  We help families understand that care techniques must adapt as a person progresses through the disease.  Here is a good summary of the six GEM levels.

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Want to learn more about how we can help your loved one living with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia?  Call us today at 610-323-9800.

 

Overview of the GEM levels

NursePartners practices the GEMTM level approach to connect with our clients living with dementia.  One of the first things we teach carepartners is to find new ways to say hello.  Depending on a client’s GEMTM stage, we need to communicate through engaging other senses.

Each of our clients receives an activity basket and customized plan of care.  Carepartners help engage older adults in meaningful projects and activities of daily living.  A nurse visits clients biweekly to ensure the success of our approaches and address signs of progression.

NursePartners admin have all completed the GEMTM training and include dementia coaches and practitioners.  We are committed to honoring our clients and assisting their families.

 

Understanding Fall Risks

Falls are a common and serious problem affecting many older adults. Individuals suffering with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia however, are twice as likely to experience annual falls and fractures. This varies from a range of factors including medication, night waking, shuffling, weakening musculature and balance. The first step in protecting your loved one from a serious injury associated with a fall is understanding the risk factors.

 

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The following are common causes of falls:

Health Conditions

While everyone is at risk for falls, older adults are at the greatest risk due to chronic health conditions such as heart disease, arthritis, low blood pressure, Parkinson’s disease, dementia and other cognitive impairments. While some individuals in the early stages of Alzheimer’s are in excellent physical condition, many others seem to develop difficulties before cognitive impairment even begins. As Alzheimer’s progresses, it can cause lack of coordination, muscle weakness and diminished joint flexibility.

Reaction Time

As we get older, the nerves that carry information to and from the brain deteriorate. This slows reaction time and the ability to navigate around obstacles. This can be hazardous as seniors do not react as quickly in dangerous situations.

Medication

Many medicines also have side effects, causing dizziness, drowsiness and impaired vision.

Environmental Hazards

Many times, falls can happen because of environmental factors and hazards found throughout the home. These include everything from wet or slippery floors, poor lighting, to tripping hazards such as loose rugs, uneven floors, and trailing wires.

Visual-Spatial Problems

Because Alzheimer’s disease can affect the visual-spatial abilities, an individual can misinterpret and misjudge steps, uneven terrain, shiny areas on the floor or changes in floor color.

What you can do:

  1. Identify the risk factors for your loved one. Many people with Alzheimer’s and dementia suffer from poor eyesight, shuffling gait, muscle weakness and generalized frailty.
  2. Minimize or avoid medications that have been linked to falls. People with dementia are also more likely to fall when taking sedatives, tranquilizers, and antipsychotics.
  3. Exercise is important in preventing people from falling, especially if it includes balance and strength exercises. Ask the doctor about leg strength, gait, and balance evaluations. These tests help can determine physical risk factors.
  4. Consider a physical therapist or occupational therapist. These experts can work with your loved one to develop exercises strengthen joints.
  5. Make sure your loved one has eye tests regularly. Low vision is a huge risk factor for falls, and many vision problems come on gradually but steadily.  NursePartners’ use of theGEMTM methodology will also alert us towards changes in vision.
  6. Finally, get a home-safety assessment. Carepartners routinely perform these and can target danger spots and suggest easy improvements. This assessment can focus specifically on the needs of your loved one.

If you or a loved one is thinking about home care assistance, our team would love to help. Contact us today.

 

Sources:
Heerema, Esther. “Common Causes of Falls in People with Dementia.” Verywell.com. N.p., 31 Dec. 2015. Web. 30 May 2016.
 Perkins, Chris. “Dementia and Falling.” Continuing Medical Education 35.1 (2008): n. pag. Web. 31 May 2016.