Tag: home care Montgomery County

Vision Changes for those Living with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia

Our field of vision changes as we age, but the changes are drastic for a person living with dementia.  Eventually the field of vision becomes so restricted that sight becomes a main obstacle in carepartners connecting before providing care.  The results could worsen anxiety, hallucinations, mood swings, aggression, and other behavioral issues. 
Visual deterioration progresses in the following order:
  1. 45* peripheral (This is the normal range of vision for an older adult 75 years young.)
  2. Tunnel vision (The width is about a yard in diameter.  Loss of sight occurs in all directions: left, right, up, and down.)
  3. Binocular vision (Cup your hands around your eyes or use a pair of binoculars to experience this for yourself.)
  4. Restricted binocular (Cup your hands tighter around each eye, until they are just loose enough to fit a pencil through each opening.)
  5. Monocular (The brain shuts off vision to one eye.  This is because the brain is prioritizing other bodily functions such as digestion, respiration, and blood circulation.)
NursePartners practices the positive physical approach to care.  We emphasize the importance of recognizing these changes in order to build meaningful and successful relationships.  Admin includes dementia practitioners and coaches that train our carepartners in dementia care before placing them to work with our clients.  
Want to learn more about our dementia training?  Think these approaches can enhance the quality of life for your loved one? 

Call us to learn more about how we can help: 610-323-9800.

Philadelphia demenia care, Philadelphia home care, Philadelphia Alzheimer's disease“Ambers”, or clients living in a middle stage of dementia, experience the world with binocular vision.
If you want to learn more about reducing challenging behaviors, check out this article from Pines Education.
 

Visual Cues and Decluttering for Those Living with Dementia

On Monday, November 13 at 12:30pm the National Aging in Place Council of Philadelphia will present on dementia and the importance of decluttering.  The program is titled “Visual Cues and Decluttering for Those Living with Dementia”.  It will be hosted at the Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill.

The goal of the seminar is to educate participants as to how dementia changes our senses and our responses towards external stimuli. Understanding the disease progression is crucial for being able to successfully adapt and to begin the dialogue of decluttering. 

Older adults thrive in an organizes and simplified environment.  By reducing clutter, older adults will be able to find the items they need and minimize the risk of falls.  However, even given the risks, the actual tasks of organizing and decluttering needs to be handled in a sensitive way.  The disposal of an item does not imply that we are forgetting experiences. 

We will also discuss the physical removal of items from the home.  This step must be done in a sensitive way too, understanding that each individual values items differently.  The removal is done in a responsible manner, always considering the possibility for donation, resale, and recycle.   

The presenters are founding members of the National Aging in Place Council (“NAIPC”) of Philadelphia.  Together the NAIPC serves as a consortium of industry leaders who hold themselves to ethical standards in their commitment to helping older adults age in place. 

If you would like to join us next Monday , please email philadelphia@ageinplace.com

Our presenters include:

  • Bode Hennegan, Life Managers & Associates
  • Bill Read, JDog Junk Removal & Hauling
  • Peter Abraldes, NursePartners, Inc.

 

Responding to Pacing Behavior in Dementia

As a caretaker or family member, you may notice that sometimes a loved one with dementia can display signs of pacing. He or she may become restless, causing a need to move around. They might wander back and forth – sometimes to the point of exhaustion. Individuals who walkabout, may also feel agitated and take on repetitive moments.

When an individual with dementia starts to behave differently, this can often mistakenly be seen as a result of Dementia. It’s important to see beyond the behavior itself and think about what may be causing it. Looking at the underlying factors might help you identify the needs of your loved one and reduce these behaviors. Try to evaluate whether the pacing is problematic, or if you as a carepartner can alter your response to their behavior.

Rather than dismissing it, it is important to think about how to preserve their independence, dignity and safety.

 

So what causes pacing in Dementia?

  • Restlessness (as a symptom of dementia or a side effect of medication)
  • Relieving pain and discomfort
  • Boredom
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Feeling lost (searching for something familiar)
  • Responding to anxiety and stress
  • Need for the bathroom, hunger or thirst
  • Disorientation or confusion

Here’s how you can respond to pacing behavior:

  1.   Your loved one might wander or pace in response to basic needs like human contact, hunger, or thirst. Ensure that their basic needs are met, and that he or she is not in pain.
  2.   If night time walking or pacing is a particular issue, your loved one may have sleeping difficulties. Monitoring caffeine and alcohol consumption in the evenings, as well as avoiding daytime napping can reduce restlessness and pacing.
  3.   Constant pacing may also reveal that your loved one is not getting enough physical activity. Encouraging them to incorporate more exercise in their daily routine can reduce the spare energy exerted during restlessness.
  4.   New surroundings can trigger feelings of confusion and uncertainty. If you find that your loved one’s behavior has worsened due to a new location or surrounding, showing them familiar items can assure them that they belong. Your loved one may also need extra help finding their way about. It may be helpful to provide signs to familiarize them with their surroundings.
  5.   Offering meaningful activities that engage your loved one can relieve boredom and diminish pacing. Being occupied can provide them with a sense of purpose, keeping them mentally engaged and physically active.
  6.   If your loved one appears to be constantly distressed or the pacing worsens, call a physician to ask about possible medications that can help.

Our carepartners are dedicated to improving quality of life.  If your loved one need home care assistance or relief, our team would love to help: Contact Us Today.

Study to evaluate the impact of a cancer fighting drug on slowing neurodegenerative disease progression

This NPR article discusses how Nilotinib seems to work by eliminating toxic proteins that build up in the brains of people with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The drug seems to activate a mechanism in brain cells that acts like a sort of garbage disposal.  Read the entire article on NRP.

Currently Georgetown University is looking for participants for a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the impact of low doses of a cancer fighting drug on slowing the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Learn more about the study.

NursePartners does not advocate for any specific type of medication.  Our holistic approach seeks to connect before providing care.  For clients with advanced forms of dementia, we explore different ways to say hello and communicate.

Our carepartners follow the Teepa Snow’s positive physical approach to dementia care.  Through extensive training, carepartners learn how to deescalate situations and build meaningful relationships with our clients.  We do not promote a purely medicated method for working with clients living with dementia.