Tag: Philadelphia dementia care

ARTZ Philadelphia Opens the Doors to People Living with Dementia

NursePartners seeks out resources for family members of clients living with dementia  We find that children and spouses often find themselves burdened with their new role as caregiver, forgetting how to connect with their loved one on other levels.  Programs such as ARTZ Philadelphia brings the client and their caregiver together to talk about what they learn.  Caregivers are often surprised by how they are able to reconnect with their family members or clients.

 

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The following answers were provided by Susan Shifrin, Founder and Executive Director of ARTZ Philadelphia.

 

 

How do families participate in your program?

In our museum programs, people with dementia diagnoses and their family members come together to engage in conversations that we facilitate about art.

Carepartners and those they love to participate on an even footing.  What ends up happening is that participants rediscover the joy of conversing with one another about things other than illness.

The carepartners tend to witness their loved ones behaving differently than they might at home.  They see their wit, their humor, their intellectual engagement with the art and with others in the group. This can remind the carepartners of all the attributes they love about the people they are caring for.

 

What is the cost of admission?

Absolutely free.

 

Can I bring my loved one if they are in a wheelchair?

100% yes.  All of our ARTZ @ The Museum sites accommodate individuals in wheelchairs.  When people first register for our programs, we send them an informal survey to assess their particular needs before their first experience with us: do they have low vision, are they hard of hearing in one ear, do they require assistance walking?  When we set up the seating for our programs, people in wheelchairs will be front and center for group conversations.

We do our best in general to ensure that participants are physically positioned to take the most from the program.

 

I am a professional carepartner, not a family member.  Can I still attend?

Absolutely.  We had a wonderful woman named Eve who came to museum programs for three years, hardly missing one.  Eve came with her professional carepartner.

After Eve passed away, the professional carepartner approached ARTZ director about assisting other clients.  Now she accompanies a new client to the program.

The carepartner was almost as beloved as Eve by the original group.

The connection is the same for all attendees.

 

I am not an art history expert, is this the right program for me?

Our programs aren’t about art history or expertise (though both are welcomed if participants bring them).  It is about being in the moment and connecting with other people around a work of art.

80% of participants start by saying they do not know anything about art.  They end up being the liveliest and most opinionated about art, receiving validation by group.

 

What other similar resources are available to me?

ARTZ has one program specifically for carepartners, called Cafes for carepartners.  This is to give carepartners time to do things they believe are fun, engaging, and stimulating with others who know what they are going through.  These cafes are not support groups, though they offer supportive experiences. While care partners sometimes choose to talk about their caregiving experiences with each other, just as often, they don’t. It’s completely up to them to set the agenda.

Cafés for Care Partners also offer opportunities to tour gardens and museums.  When we are about to partner with a new museum or art center, we invite our care partners to vet the new sites before we incorporate them into our programs.

ARTZ is hoping to develop new programs around music.

ARTZ has a partnership with Jefferson that pairs people living with dementia at various stages  and/or care partners (both are called “mentors”) to medical, nursing, pharmacy, and occupational therapy students over a period from six to eight weeks.  The program participants first get to know one another through shared experiences around works of art.  Over time, students get to know those with the diagnosis as people first, through series of one-on-one encounters.  Mentors teach future healthcare providers what it means to live with dementia, from the inside out.

Health professions students tell us that they are reminded why they chose to go into medicine through this program.  They went into medicine to make human connections.

 

If I want to go to your next event, what should I do?

If you have access to the Internet, go to website www.artzphilly.org.  Choose “participate in a program” on the home page.  You will see “ARTZ in the museum”.  Click on this.

The new page will tell you more and what you can expect.  Go to the section “Explore Upcoming Events”.  There is a little button next to the program that says, “Register Now”.

If you do not have access to the web, you can make a phone call to Susan, 610-721-1606 and she will make sure you are listed on the program.

There is a monthly newsletter, you can sign up for it via the website (https://www.artzphilly.org/) of their Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/ARTZPhiladelphia/).

Hallucinations in Lewy Bodies and other types of dementia

Below is a video clip from Teepa Snow, explaining how the type of hallucination dictates our response.  This video clip is the basis of this article.

Hallucinations: Visual, Verbal, Tactile

Hallucinations are common for older adults living with dementia, especially Lewy Bodies.  As carepartners, it is our responsibility to address the vision and make the care recipient more comfortable.  In order to do this, we need to understand how the person feels about their hallucination.

  • Does the person living with dementia think they are in their childhood home with their favorite dog?
  • Does the person living with dementia believe other residents are hiding in their bathroom?
  • Is someone stealing something from the client’s room?
  • Is a traumatic childhood experience resurfacing?

Our first task is to answer the following question: Does the hallucination scare our client?

If the hallucination is not scary, ask the person how they feel about the image.  Go over to the area with the older adult and look where they gaze.  Ask questions.  Listen to their responses and formulate new questions based on those answers.  Your goal is to get as many details as possible about the hallucination.

As you delve deeper, the original hallucination will disappear.  Eventually their brain will not be able to match their own verbal responses to the image “seen” by their visual sensory organs.

This is your opportunity to switch the topic.  Engage them in a new activity and move out of the original environment.  Do not mention anything that allows them to circuit back to the hallucination.

 

In order to help, we first must understand how the hallucination makes the older adult feel.  

If the client is visibly scared by the hallucination, our approach needs to be different.

We should not ask them for more information about the image!  Instead, we need to offer them more immediate sensory input.

Those living with dementia have a heightened sensation in the palm of their hands.  They also loose the “skill” capacity in some fingers as all fingers become used for “strength”.  By using the hand-under-hand technique, you protect the care recipient and yourself, while providing reassurance.  You are able to guide their next action by retaining a grasp.

When faced with scary hallucinations, you can apply immediate and repeated pressure to their palms by pumping your palm against theirs.  This sensation feels good and will help to redirect their attention.

You will want to be on the person’s preferred side.  This is also known as their dominant side or the side in which they prefer to write.  This is important because it allows you to draw their view more easily.  The client also pays more attention to data and sound on their dominant side.

Simultaneously, you should show that you are worried!  Ensure your face and words match.  Tell and show them how worried you are about the hallucination.

Follow up with an action plan.  Now that you understand, how will you help?  What will you do to get the object to go away?  Where will the client go to be safe?  Describe your next few action steps to the care recipient.  Continue to use the hand-under-hand approach, pump their palm, and continue to look and sound concerned.

Hallucinations are not preventable for those living with Lewy Bodies dementia.  However, we can work to minimize their occurrences in other forms of dementia.  The typical triggers for hallucinations are an emotional experience from that day or week that causes the client to time travel, emotional distress, infection, and dehydration.  A hallucination may be a sign that something else is wrong physiologically with the client.

 

 

 

 

 

Patience when caring for someone living with dementia

Patience is crucial when caring for someone living with dementia.  Often times the burden of care falls uneven on a spouse or a child who lives close to their parents.  It takes us a while, if at all, to realize that it takes more than one person to support another living with dementia.

When an interaction is not going as planned, we suggest the following steps:

 

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1.) Step Back: It is okay to not have an immediate response.  Think before you react and ensure your facial and body language matches your words.  We want to make sure we are engaging visual stimuli before offering a verbal message.  As Teepa Snow suggests, engage the senses by offering cues in the following sequence: visual, verbal, touch.

If the person living with dementia is doing an undesirable activity, consider if the activity is dangerous to them or others.  If it is not, reassess the urgency of change.  Could this be a moment for connection?

 

2.) Respond instead of Reacting: A thorough response requires doing the analysis to see why we seek to change the current behavior.  Are we imposing our logic on their situation?  Could it be that we are not taking the time to enter their reality?  This can be a mentally draining task and is one of the reasons why caregivers become frustrated with the person entrusted in their care.

Sometimes we are not trying to correct a behavior, but rather a narrative.  A person living with dementia might be time traveling or experiencing a hallucination.  Instead of trying to reorient them to reality, take that time to ask them questions about their past or their visions.  Often times we can find our best moments of connection by patiently requesting that they tell us more.

Throughout our response, we want to incorporate the art of substitution before subtraction.  If we want to remove something from their hands, offer them something else to hold first.  If we want to free them from a hallucination, ask more questions.  Often times they will reach a point where their mind no longer can describe the often that does not exist.

 

3.) Make plans, but expect them to change: Put your agenda in your back pocket.  It is often very difficult for non-caregivers to understand why it takes so long to accomplish the activities of daily living.  Why does it take an hour to take a shower?  Why does it take two sittings to finish a meal?

Our approach matters, and unlike caring for a child, an older adult has lived a long life and is used to be being treated with dignity and respect.  Although their memories may have faded, these feelings of pride are deeply engrained.  We need to go with their flow, not the other way around.  We need to take extra measures that may not seem “logical” in order to satisfy their emotional needs.

A classic example of this would be wrapping a towel around the care recipient in the shower.  Although this might make the cleaning process more challenging, it allows the person being showered to feel less exposed to caregiver.

 

4.) Figure out what you can and cannot control:   We need to remember that activities are a means to connect with the person living with dementia.  If we are playing a known game, it is okay to throw out the rules.  For example, instead of playing a card game, why not sort the deck?  As the disease progresses, your loved one might derive more comfort from holding items versus sorting them.  This is okay.  We are learning to adapt to their changing senses and using these to find new ways to say hello.  If you are unfamiliar with GEM levels, learn more here.

Here are some ideas for activities for someone living with dementia.  At NursePartners, we provide activity baskets to our clients living with dementia.  These typically include coloring, puzzles, and cards.  Activities are introduced and rotated out as interests or abilities change.

 

5.) Take care of yourself: We impose our logic on the person living with dementia, but fail to apply it to ourselves.  No matter how much help you have, you also need a break!  Caring for a person living with dementia can be a daunting task.  If you are emotionally drained or physically inept to perform your role, you become less helpful for the person needing your care.  It is not selfish, but rather essential, to take time to enjoy your life and keep yourself healthy.  

Please ask us for more support resources.  NursePartners is a founding member of the National Aging in Place Council of Philadelphia.  We invest our time in this organization in order to comfortably refer you to resources in our community, some of which are free.

 

This article was inspired by Teepa Snow and a post by AgingCare.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Overview of the GEM levels

NursePartners practices the GEMTM level approach to connect with our clients living with dementia.  One of the first things we teach carepartners is to find new ways to say hello.  Depending on a client’s GEMTM stage, we need to communicate through engaging other senses.

Each of our clients receives an activity basket and customized plan of care.  Carepartners help engage older adults in meaningful projects and activities of daily living.  A nurse visits clients biweekly to ensure the success of our approaches and address signs of progression.

NursePartners admin have all completed the GEMTM training and include dementia coaches and practitioners.  We are committed to honoring our clients and assisting their families.

 

The 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

The Alzheimer’s Association presents the following as warnings signs of Alzheimer’s disease:

  1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems
  3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, work, or leisure
  4. Confusion with time or place
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
  6. New problems with words in speaking or writing
  7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps
  8. Decreased or poor judgment
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities
  10. Changes in mood and personality

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As we age, our organs do not perform as before.  The brain is no exception.  Some natural cognitive decline is natural.  When presenting the early warning signs, it is important that we put each warning sign in its proper context.

It is also important to remember that each person has their own baseline.  We do not all have the same skills or personalities.  Life experiences and family relationships also impact how we develop as individuals.  In order to receive a proper diagnosis, a physician must take the time to fully understand the personality and life experiences.  Other factors such as  stress, depression, and vitamin deficiencies might be to blame.

  1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life
    • Forgetting the names of new classroom of students is normal.  This is different from being unable to remember the name of your spouse or children (if you have a few!).  Typically we forget names, but are able to remember them on our own later.
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems
    • This is relative to your problem solving skills when you were younger.  If these skills were never strong, they will also be weak as an older adult.
  3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, work, or leisure.
    • The key word is “familiar”.  If you have never been good at folding clothes, this is not a familiar task, and therefore there is no cause for concern that you still cannot do it well.
  4. Confusion with time or place
    • It is normal to write the year wrong in January or to think it is Tuesday when it is in fact Wednesday.  Life stresses causing us to loose track of the passage of small periods of time.  However, it is not normal to perceive yourself as being in the opposite season or many years in the past.
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
    • Vision generally worsens as we age.  Older adults aged 75+ typically have peripheral vision of about 45 degrees in each direction.  Older adults living with dementia will develop tunnel vision.  Eventually this vision becomes binocular and then monocular.  They will also have issues gauging distance while driving or recognizing the depth perception of items in a room.
  6. New problems with words in speaking or writing
    • Some older adults may have a stutter or become timid in large group settings.  Their energy level or stress can also impact their ability to speak well.  We also all forget the names of items, especially words that we use infrequently.  It is not normal to forget words that are common to our every day life.  If we forget them, we may remember them by mentioning other related words.  If we think of the common word after this activity, this may be a sign of a developing cognitive impairment.
  7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps
    • We all loose our keys, unless we are very disciplined!  We may leave them in our pockets, put them on the counter, or periodically forget to even bring them out of the car.  These are all normal acts.  What is abnormal is putting keys in the fruit bowl, refrigerator, or give them to a friendly stranger.
  8. Decreased or poor judgment
    • Related to the above, poor judgment might be falling victim to a sweepstakes scam or donating more than you can afford.  We all have different levels of judgment, but typically this decline is hard to uncover in family and friends.
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities
    • This is especially relevant for extroverts.  If a person finds themselves suddenly lost in a conversation this could be an issue.  However, we should consider other issues such as depression or exhaustion.  Introverts may avoid social activities, but enjoy gatherings among family and a few friends.  If these behaviors change over the course of months or years, this might be cause for concern.
  10. Changes in mood and personality
    • These are differences that arise over the course of the medium and long term.  Keep in mind that life experiences can also permanently impact one’s personality.  It is important to take the time to understand if traumatic incidents are to blame.

 

 

 

 

Understanding Behaviors and Adapting Approaches in Dementia Care

Your role as caregiver, family member, or friend evolves with the progression of dementia.  Even faced with challenging behaviors, you can still connect with your loved one and fill their day with meaningful activities.  NursePartners is here to support you while your relationship evolves with the person living with dementia.

 

What is their behavior telling you?

We are constantly learning more about the brain’s ability to comprehend messages.  This includes messages that are delivered through speech versus writing, in a crowded space versus a one-on-one situation, or even a familiar voice versus one of a stranger.

Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias can cause people to act in unpredictable ways. Some individuals become anxious or aggressive while others repeat certain questions or gestures. Messages can be misinterpreted, surprising both the care recipient and caregiver. These types of reactions lead to misunderstanding, frustration, and tension.

It’s important to understand your loved one is not trying to be difficult and that these behaviors are also forms of communication.

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Tips for managing behavioral changes

As carepartners, we need to adapt our delivery process throughout the progression of the disease. When we carry on a traditional conversation, we usually engage in a back and forth volley of information. When a person is diagnosed with dementia, it is important to realize that the three essential language skills for processing and sharing verbal messages need to be supported in different ways. These core linguistic skills are:

  • Vocabulary (the words – the meaning of the content)
  • Comprehension (receptive language – the ability to process the message)
  • Speech production (expressive language – the ability to deliver the message)

Certain retained skills will assist you in conveying a message:

  • Social chit-chat (the back and forth that can mask loss of comprehension, but covers in short simple conversations)
  • Rhythm of speech (this includes awareness of the rhythm of a question that is seeking an answer, as well as ability to sustain rhythm or hear a rhythm that sounds familiar).  Additionally it can and does signal changes in emotion – changes in frequency, intensity, or volume can indicate shifts in emotional state or discomfort.
  • Rhythmic speech as is present in music, poetry, prayer, counting and even spelling.

What you can do:

There are important supportive phrases that can help when they are used in combination with pauses, inflections, visual cues, props, and partial reflective statement to confirm what was said or south:

  1. Seek more information by being nonspecific, try phrases such as  “Tell me more about it.”
  2. Seek demonstration or visual representation with phrases such as  “Could you show me how you would use it?” or“Show me how you’d do it.”
  3. Offer simplified options, by using two options at a time, or encouraging yes/no responses.  Employ the use of object pronouns.

What can help:

Awareness, knowledge, skill and support for both parties.

Mary Stehle, licensed social worker and Senior Care Advisor says, “A person with Alzheimer’s who has lost the ability to understand and communicate through language is always looking for cues from us as to how to interpret the world. They are constantly reading our tone of voice, facial expressions, and body language. When we are tired, stressed, and resentful, they pick up on this and it often impacts them negatively.” It’s important to remember that asking for help is not an act of selfishness, it’s providing better care for both you and your loved one.

We can be by their side when you can’t be. If your loved one need home care assistance or relief – Contact us today.

NursePartners is committed to providing uncompromised care to those living with a diagnosis of dementia. Our carepartners work with each family to enable safety, comfort and happiness through home-care services.

Understanding Fall Risks

Falls are a common and serious problem affecting many older adults. Individuals suffering with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia however, are twice as likely to experience annual falls and fractures. This varies from a range of factors including medication, night waking, shuffling, weakening musculature and balance. The first step in protecting your loved one from a serious injury associated with a fall is understanding the risk factors.

 

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The following are common causes of falls:

Health Conditions

While everyone is at risk for falls, older adults are at the greatest risk due to chronic health conditions such as heart disease, arthritis, low blood pressure, Parkinson’s disease, dementia and other cognitive impairments. While some individuals in the early stages of Alzheimer’s are in excellent physical condition, many others seem to develop difficulties before cognitive impairment even begins. As Alzheimer’s progresses, it can cause lack of coordination, muscle weakness and diminished joint flexibility.

Reaction Time

As we get older, the nerves that carry information to and from the brain deteriorate. This slows reaction time and the ability to navigate around obstacles. This can be hazardous as seniors do not react as quickly in dangerous situations.

Medication

Many medicines also have side effects, causing dizziness, drowsiness and impaired vision.

Environmental Hazards

Many times, falls can happen because of environmental factors and hazards found throughout the home. These include everything from wet or slippery floors, poor lighting, to tripping hazards such as loose rugs, uneven floors, and trailing wires.

Visual-Spatial Problems

Because Alzheimer’s disease can affect the visual-spatial abilities, an individual can misinterpret and misjudge steps, uneven terrain, shiny areas on the floor or changes in floor color.

What you can do:

  1. Identify the risk factors for your loved one. Many people with Alzheimer’s and dementia suffer from poor eyesight, shuffling gait, muscle weakness and generalized frailty.
  2. Minimize or avoid medications that have been linked to falls. People with dementia are also more likely to fall when taking sedatives, tranquilizers, and antipsychotics.
  3. Exercise is important in preventing people from falling, especially if it includes balance and strength exercises. Ask the doctor about leg strength, gait, and balance evaluations. These tests help can determine physical risk factors.
  4. Consider a physical therapist or occupational therapist. These experts can work with your loved one to develop exercises strengthen joints.
  5. Make sure your loved one has eye tests regularly. Low vision is a huge risk factor for falls, and many vision problems come on gradually but steadily.  NursePartners’ use of theGEMTM methodology will also alert us towards changes in vision.
  6. Finally, get a home-safety assessment. Carepartners routinely perform these and can target danger spots and suggest easy improvements. This assessment can focus specifically on the needs of your loved one.

If you or a loved one is thinking about home care assistance, our team would love to help. Contact us today.

 

Sources:
Heerema, Esther. “Common Causes of Falls in People with Dementia.” Verywell.com. N.p., 31 Dec. 2015. Web. 30 May 2016.
 Perkins, Chris. “Dementia and Falling.” Continuing Medical Education 35.1 (2008): n. pag. Web. 31 May 2016.

Responding to Pacing Behavior in Dementia

As a caretaker or family member, you may notice that sometimes a loved one with dementia can display signs of pacing. He or she may become restless, causing a need to move around. They might wander back and forth – sometimes to the point of exhaustion. Individuals who walkabout, may also feel agitated and take on repetitive moments.

When an individual with dementia starts to behave differently, this can often mistakenly be seen as a result of Dementia. It’s important to see beyond the behavior itself and think about what may be causing it. Looking at the underlying factors might help you identify the needs of your loved one and reduce these behaviors. Try to evaluate whether the pacing is problematic, or if you as a carepartner can alter your response to their behavior.

Rather than dismissing it, it is important to think about how to preserve their independence, dignity and safety.

 

So what causes pacing in Dementia?

  • Restlessness (as a symptom of dementia or a side effect of medication)
  • Relieving pain and discomfort
  • Boredom
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Feeling lost (searching for something familiar)
  • Responding to anxiety and stress
  • Need for the bathroom, hunger or thirst
  • Disorientation or confusion

Here’s how you can respond to pacing behavior:

  1.   Your loved one might wander or pace in response to basic needs like human contact, hunger, or thirst. Ensure that their basic needs are met, and that he or she is not in pain.
  2.   If night time walking or pacing is a particular issue, your loved one may have sleeping difficulties. Monitoring caffeine and alcohol consumption in the evenings, as well as avoiding daytime napping can reduce restlessness and pacing.
  3.   Constant pacing may also reveal that your loved one is not getting enough physical activity. Encouraging them to incorporate more exercise in their daily routine can reduce the spare energy exerted during restlessness.
  4.   New surroundings can trigger feelings of confusion and uncertainty. If you find that your loved one’s behavior has worsened due to a new location or surrounding, showing them familiar items can assure them that they belong. Your loved one may also need extra help finding their way about. It may be helpful to provide signs to familiarize them with their surroundings.
  5.   Offering meaningful activities that engage your loved one can relieve boredom and diminish pacing. Being occupied can provide them with a sense of purpose, keeping them mentally engaged and physically active.
  6.   If your loved one appears to be constantly distressed or the pacing worsens, call a physician to ask about possible medications that can help.

Our carepartners are dedicated to improving quality of life.  If your loved one need home care assistance or relief, our team would love to help: Contact Us Today.

NursePartners becomes the second SAGE-certified Pennsylvania home care company

SAGE Care LGBT Cultural Competency Training - 2017 Bronze

NursePartners, Inc. is proud to be the only home care company in Philadelphia that is SAGETM certified for LGBT Seniors.  As an Independence Business Alliance (“IBA”) member and sponsor for many years, we know that aging LGBT seniors face a unique set of challenges when it is time to receive personal care.  If they move into an assisted living community or nursing home, they may have to hide their identities or not participate in favorite activities.  This forced change is not only difficult, but it is one that should never happen.

 

We sought to make a difference by training 25% of our employees to better understand how to connect and care for the aging LGBT community.  The training taught employees the intergenerational and racial nuances that apply to LGBT older adults. We learned how respond to bias behavior, incorporated new vocabulary, and received an overview of federal protections.

Previously these same employees completed the GEMTM training, a 7.5-hour training module that refines approaches for working with clients living with dementia.  This training involves role playing with a dementia coach and working through challenging behaviors.  Many of the techniques in Teepa Snow’s Positive Physical Approach to CareTM can also be applied to clients not living with a diagnosis of dementia.  This is because we focus just as much on our approach as the quality of care delivered.

We are prepared to service older LGBT adults in the Philadelphia region.  The following are some of the tasks our carepartners can complete:

  • Bathing, Grooming, and Hygiene
  • Mobility Assistance
  • Transferring and Positioning
  • Feeding and Diet monitoring
  • Toileting and Incontinence Care
  • Meal Preparation
  • Laundry
  • Light Housekeeping
  • Grocery Shopping/Errands
  • Grocery Delivery Coordination
  • Transportation in private vehicles or public transportation
  • Medication Reminders

All clients receive a care of plan uniquely made for them.  These plans are developed by a registered nurse and adjusted accordingly as conditions change.

NursePartners values the relationship with the client as much as with their family.  We know that the journey may be challenging and we are here to offer support.

Effective Communication Strategies

Tomorrow Angela Geiger will present on behalf of the Alzheimer’s Association. Angela is a certified dementia practitioner, registered nurse, and founder of NursePartners, Inc. We have been servicing older adults living with a diagnosis of dementia since 2002.

Effective communication is crucial for establishing a good relationship between the carepartner and the care recipient. You will learn new ways to “say hello” and connect as the disease progresses. Angela will show us how to incorporate the Positive Physical ApproachTM into daily interactions to make them more meaningful and successful.

She will also explain how we can connect through each of the senses. As the disease progresses, some senses are heightened. We will also learn how to use visual cuing over verbal cuing. Often those living with dementia invent words to communicate. We should anticipate these changes and react accordingly. By knowing the care recipient’s history, we will increase the odds of our success.

It is also important to ensure that the care recipient still feel competent and involved in their own care. We can make this possible by simplifying the decision process. This is done by minimizing distractions and communicating directly with the care recipient.

We look forward to seeing you tomorrow at the Delaware Valley Veteran Home at 2pm.

The address is 2701 Southampton Road, Philadelphia, PA 19154.