Category: Delaware County

Exercise for those living with dementia

Exercise is essential for a healthy lifestyle, contributing to physical and mental health, muscle control, coordination, and a sense of wellbeing. It plays a huge role in reducing Alzheimer’s and dementia, by maintaining blood flow to the brain and stimulating cell growth.

These are the benefits of physical exercise for these individuals:

  • improved cognition, sleep, and mood;
  • opportunities for social interaction;
  • reducing feelings of confusion and isolation;
  • improved confidence and self-esteem;
  • reduced risk of breast and colon cancer, stroke, and type II diabetes;
  • improved physical fitness (maintaining strong muscles and flexible joints can help people maintain independence for longer).

Getting started

The Department of Health recommends 150 minutes of physical activity per week. This equates to 30 minutes of activity per day. This can be broken up into shorter sessions throughout the day, with each session lasting a minimum of 10 minutes. Allow your loved one to go at their own pace. Plan a day around physical activities: a fifteen minute walk in the morning, followed by housework or gardening tasks in the afternoon.

It is important to consider ability, stage of dementia, and preference, as individuals undertake physical exercise. Some might be more adaptable to exercise, while others start with simpler activities.

Always talk to a healthcare professional before creating a exercise plan.  Often clients have previously worked with a physical therapist.  NursePartners is able to help clients follow those plans already developed.

What is the right exercise?

An exercise program incorporated into a routine in the early stages of dementia is more likely to be maintained, extending the benefits to health and well-being.

Consider a physical activity that is mentally and socially engaging, such as walking, gardening, dancing, or an exercise group. Repetitive activity such as walking on a treadmill or using an exercise bike can also help reduce anxiety and confusion.

Exercise in the later stages of dementia

If possible, physical activity can be very beneficial in the later stages of dementia.

Some suggested exercises:

  • Have your loved one sit on one end of the bed, and then scoot to the other end while sitting. This exercise is good practice for getting up from a chair;
  • Encourage them to sit in a different chair at each mealtime throughout the day;
  • Help them sit without support. This exercise helps with balance and posture and can form part of everyday activities;
  • Have your loved one walk short distances between rooms as part of a daily routine.  This will help maintain muscle strength and joint flexibility.

Physical activity creates an opportunity for your loved one to socialize with others, as well as working to improve and maintain their independence. NursePartners is committed to providing uncompromised care to those living with a diagnosis of dementia. Our carepartners are trained in the Positive Approach to Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care (GEMS™) and work with families to enable safety, comfort, and happiness through home care services.

If your loved one need home care assistance or relief, our team would love to help.

Contact us today.

Substituting and Subtracting

NursePartners emphasizes the need to substitute and then subtract when helping someone living with dementia.  This requires thinking creatively and making the care recipient feel as though they are effectively communicating their need or desire.

Our team helps the person living with dementia feel heard and acknowledged by joining their world.  We spend extra time connecting before providing care.  If the person is trying to communicate something, we ask them to tell us about it.  If they are noticeably upset or sad, we take that extra moment to enter that emotional state ourselves for a little.  For someone unable to communicate effectively, this opportunity to describe something they forget or connect emotionally will allows us to provide care and for both the carepartner and the client to feel good about our interaction.

Click here to listen to what an assisted living community does in Germany: Waiting for the Bus to Nowhere

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