Tag: Positive Approach to Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care

Daily Care: Late Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

How can we, family and carepartners, support the people we know living with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia?

Keeping loved ones stimulated and providing ability-based care and support cannot be overstated. At NursePartners, we recognize the GEMS™ model as an effective method for providing a treatment plan for individuals affected by dementia.  Click here for an introductory overview of the classification system describing the stages of the journey.

By appreciating what is changing and what is still possible, we can provide care that is more effective and less challenging.

 

Stage 3 – Severe/Late (lasts about one 1-3 years) – Rubies and Pearls

As dementia moves into the final stage, it can be difficult to know how to meet needs. Many lose their ability to control movement and respond to the environment. As memory and cognitive skills worsen, your loved one may need extensive help with daily activities.

The goal of care at this stage is to focus on preserving dignity and quality of life. Although your loved one may lose the ability talk and express needs, you can still connect with them, enjoying interactions and experiences of their past life.

 

About Rubies and Pearls

Rubies

Rubies experience late stage changes as fine motor skills are very limited. Losses in depth perception, as well as limited visual awareness and major sensory changes result in needed assistance with utensils, brushing, buttoning and moving. Hand-under-hand assistance helps rubies feel safe and secure. Suggested activities together include: reading, playing music, and looking through old photos.

Pearls

Pearls are still and quiet, unable to actively move or respond, with limited awareness of the world. Pearls enjoy pleasant sounds and familiar voices, grasping onto moments of connection.  Whether it’s the smell of their favorite perfume, or a beloved radio program, these small experiences can help capture a moment in time and evoke pleasant memories. Being present, patient, and understanding with your loved one will help them escape feelings of isolation associated with late stage Alzheimer’s.

Planning the Day

  • Tailor the environment with the interests of your loved one. This can allow them to emotionally connect to things they previously enjoyed.
  • Plan the days to have a balance of restful and active periods to help your loved ones transition slowly and gradually from one to the other.
  • Observe the person for signs of stress. Keep lights low and noise to a minimum. Consider visiting in smaller numbers.
  • Use your voice to engage and encourage, talking quietly to tell stories and reminiscing about past events.
  • Discover which eye they use for vision.  Do not obstruct their line of site and get on or below eye level when speaking with them.

At this point in the disease, the world is primarily experienced through the senses. You can express your caring through touch, sound, sight, taste and smell.

Activities for Rubies and Pearls

  • Playing their favorite music
  • Reminiscing about past events
  • Reading portions of books that have meaning for the person
  • Looking at old photos together
  • Preparing a favorite food
  • Rubbing lotion with a favorite scent into the skin
  • Brushing their hair
  • Sitting outside together on a nice day

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NursePartners is committed to providing uncompromised care to those living with a diagnosis of dementia. Our carepartners are trained in the Positive Approach to Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care (GEMS™) and work with families to enable safety, comfort and happiness through home-care services.

If your loved one need home care assistance or relief, our team would love to help.

Contact us today.

 

 

Daily Care: Moderate Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

We can support the people we know living with dementia by keeping them mentally stimulated and providing ability-based care and support. At NursePartners, we recognize the GEMS™ model as an effective method for providing a plan of care for individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia.  Click here for an introductory overview of the classification system and to understand the stages of the journey.

By appreciating what is changing and what is still possible, we can provide care that is more effective and less challenging.

 

Stage 2 – Moderate/Middle (lasts 2-10 yrs) – Emeralds and Ambers

At NursePartners, we use the “Emerald” or “Amber” classification for clients with moderately developed dementias.  We prefer this terminology because we know that all clients are operate at their best with the right approach to care.

A client normally persists in the Emerald and Amber stages the longest out of the other GEM levels. During this time, damage to the brain can make it difficult to express thoughts and perform routine tasks. It is important to allow your loved one to be involved in their day-to-day routine. Provide meaning through relevant activities that were part of their past because this will provide them with a sense of self-worth and add to their quality of life.

There will be acute changes to their self-awareness and senses.  We need to be able to distinguish daily changes and overall trends.  By having an established relationship with the client, we are also able to tell the difference between a client’s personality quirks and further developments of the disease.

 

About Emeralds and Ambers

 

Emeralds

Emeralds may get lost in time, thinking that are in another place or assuming a former role. They have problems with communication and comprehension, often asking questions that begin with “who”, “what”, “where”, and “when”.  At this GEM level, clients are making small mistakes with their personal care, but may not recognize it.  Some examples of this might be fastening buttons in the wrong holes, putting shoes on the wrong feet, or not changing clothing or brushing hair before leaving the home.  It is not important that we “correct every mistake”, but make changes subtly by using the right approach.  Sometimes this requires relating to the “mistake”, by discussing how we do this ourselves.  We could also pull out another piece of clothing and convince the client how good they look in that particular piece.

Emeralds are most comfortable when doing familiar tasks. They like to engage and help others, as well as feeling like they have a purpose. At a family functions, engage them by asking to help set the table and then clean it up. Choose favorite activities or hobbies of the past, but do not impose time limits for completing each task

Activities at home

Activities around the house can help Emeralds feel involved and provide a sense of normality. Activities such as setting the table, watering plants, and cooking can reflect past hobbies and interests, and can be a good way of retaining skills. Helping in the kitchen can also bring people together, as many experiences revolve around meals: holidays, birthdays, church potlucks, summer barbecues, weddings. Some activities for Emeralds include:

  • Cooking: salads, ice cream, Jell-O, pudding, no-bake cookies and pies, etc.
  • Copying recipes from magazines onto cards
  • Making a grocery list of items needed for recipes
  • Setting the table: Folding or rolling silverware into napkins

 

Ambers

Ambers like to live in moments of time, and are focused on sensation – manipulating, gathering and touching.  They are focused on wants and needs, and sometimes are exploratory without safety awareness. Their communication is limited with difficulty understanding and expressing needs, so activities selected need be familiar and sensory stimulating. Ambers may enjoy sing-alongs or being in visually stimulating outdoor locations.

Family members find it hard to find new ways “to say hello”.  We need to remember that there are other ways to communicate beyond verbally.  This is the time to start using those our methods.

Some activities for Ambers include:

  • Sorting nails, screws, and other hardware.
  • Organizing nail polish and lipsticks by color and shape.
  • Grouping coins, according to date, value or place of origin.
  • Rearranging the order of the silverware drawer by forks, spoons and knives.
  • Categorizing playing cards into decks or suits that match.

Planning the Day

  • Make a schedule and follow it: be structured but allow flexibility.
  • Offer a variety of activities everyday: leisure, work, rest, and self-care.
  • Create a flow for the day: build up and then slow down.
  • Build a foundation of familiar and favorite activities.

______________________________________________________________________________

NursePartners is committed to providing uncompromised care to those living with a diagnosis of dementia. Our carepartners are trained in the Positive Approach to Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care (GEMS™) and work with families to enable safety, comfort, and happiness through home-care services.

If your loved one need home care assistance or relief, our team would love to help.  Contact us today.

 

Daily Care: Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

 

The early stages of dementia sometimes go unnoticed, especially if the older adult lives alone.  In the cases that we do learn of an early diagnosis, the challenge becomes how to best support the person living with dementia.  Typically the diagnosis may be Alzheimer’s disease, but the reality is that there are over 80 types of dementia and other conditions that produce symptoms similar to dementia.

Keeping loved ones stimulated, and providing ability-based support and care cannot be overstated. At NursePartners, we recognize the GEMS™ model as an effective method for providing a treatment plan for individuals living with dementia. Click here for an introductory overview of the classification system and to understand the stages of the journey.

 

Stage 1 – Mild/Early (lasts 2-4 yrs) –  NursePartners refers to these individuals as “Sapphires” and “Diamonds”

In the early stages of dementia, your loved one may withdraw from activities they previously enjoyed. It is important to help them remain engaged and stimulated. Even the most simple, everyday tasks such as setting the table or folding clothes can help a person with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia feel connected to “normal” life. Activities linked to hobbies and interests can maximize choice and help build the relationship between that person and the carepartner.

 

About Sapphires and Diamonds

Sapphires

Sapphires may feel “blue” due to changes with the aging process, although there may be no significant changes in cognition.  Sapphires are committed to lifelong patterns, enjoying the things the way they always have. Sapphires prefer being asked what to do when making decisions. Pamper them – spending a spa day or a trip to the barber/beauty salon can help them feel less blue.  Sapphires are not living with dementia.

Diamonds

Diamonds are “clear and sharp,” successful with established habits and routines. Diamonds like to feel competent and valued, and it is important for them to feel comfortable and in control. A diamond can still do things as they always have, but they become more territorial and less aware of boundaries. Diamonds enjoy familiar places, whether that be a family member’s home or a favorite restaurant. Suggested activities include attending concerts or plays and getting fresh air – picnicking or walking outdoors.

 

 

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A stroll in the neighborhood helps animate most older adults.

Activities for Sapphires and Diamonds

  • Thinking: crosswords, jigsaw puzzles, cards, board games, and reading.
  • Physical: walking animals, gardening, walking, swimming, and dancing.
  • Social: visiting with family or friends, or going to a favorite restaurant.
  • Home Activities: folding laundry, feeding pets, cooking and helping in the kitchen.
  • Creative: arts and crafts projects, knitting, painting and drawing, playing music or singing.
  • Daily living: taking a shower, brushing teeth, eating, and getting dressed.

Reminiscence activities:

  • Looking through photo albums.
  • Creating a scrapbook, pasting photos onto the pages and writing notes about the memory beside the photo.
  • Reading saved letters and greeting cards.
  • Life Story Game: Ask your loved one to list the steps and necessities associated with an activity. For example: “We are going on a picnic, what would we bring in the picnic basket? Where would we go for the picnic?”

Some suggestions could be:

  1.   A day at the beach.
  2.   A ride in the country.
  3.   First day at school.
  4.   Getting married.
  5.   Social functions.

____________________________________________________________________________

NursePartners is committed to providing uncompromised care to those living with a diagnosis of dementia. Our carepartners are trained in the Positive Approach to Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care (GEMS™) and work with families to enable safety, comfort, and meaningful activity through home-care services.

If your loved one need home care assistance or relief, our team would love to help.

Contact us today.