Tag: best home care Philadelphia

Angela scheduled to be keynote speaker for “Remembering Those Who Forget”

We are excited to announce that Angela will serve as the keynote speaker for the Presbyterian Older Adult Ministry (POAM) at the event, “Remembering Those Who Forget”.  Angela will talk about her decades of experience working with those living with dementia.  She will be sure to touch upon practical care approaches that can be implemented immediately, in addition to giving her clinical perspective on the disease.  The event is open to those wanting to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

We would appreciate registration prior to attending the event.  This event is scheduled for next Thursday, May 2, at 8:30am to 1pm in Plymouth Meeting.  Exact details can be found via this link: https://presbyphl.org/events/presby-older-adult-dementia-workhop/

How do you know it’s time to start home care services?

The holidays are coming!  Sometimes with our own busy lives, time passes between each visit to our parents and other older relatives.  At a certain point, home care services can best support them, regardless of if they live at home or in a community.

When is it time to begin home care services?  It is important to remember that home care services can increase gradually.  NursePartners believes a minimum of three, four-hour assignments per week is the best way to start.  This allows the carepartner team time to establish a relationship with your loved one. All carepartners are trained to connect first.  A developed relationship is crucial for providing optimum care.

NursePartners also supports clients 24/7 in their homes, assisted living communities, and nursing homes.

But how do you know it is time to begin services?  When we notice some of the following signs, it may indicate that it is time to start.  Remember, NursePartners provides a health and wellness assessment at no cost before the initiation of services.

We welcome you to take this 20-question quiz to determine if it is time for home care services.  If you score a 25% or higher, it is probably time to schedule a no cost assessment.  All answers are confidential and will not be used for marketing purposes.

If you are still in doubt, give us a call at 610-323-9800.  All calls are answered by a real member of our administrative team.  We do not close at 5pm or on holidays.  NursePartners is a privately-owned company, founded and operated by a registered nurse and certified dementia practitioner.  We have been serving older adults in the Philadelphia area since 2002.

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Why Care Teams Fail: Avoid these four common mistakes

At NursePartners, we understand that each client is unique.  Each person was crafted by their a history of rich life experiences  If they are living with a progressive disease such as dementia, knowing these stories becomes even more important.  Eventually we will have to be the ones to remind them of their stories.

 

Realistic and transparent goals need to be set from the onset of services.  Our standards are high, but the perfect care team needs time to mature.  NursePartners screens employees based on their personality fit with specific clients.  However, just like most relationships, it takes time for clients to trust carepartners.  The best results are realized after several assignments, not the first one.  This brings us to the first reason why care teams fail:

  • Client does not give the care team enough time to mature

Solution: Exercise patience.  Let us know what we can do better and give your loved one a chance to get used to the carepartner.

 

The communication between members of the care team is also important.  NursePartners works well with other service providers, including life managers, social workers, hospitals, nursing homes, hospice, estate attorneys, and other specialists.  The family members are also part of the care team.  However, too much or too little communication can be detrimental to the level of care being provided.  Every one should be on the same page while they work for the same goal: the best care for the older adult.

  • Poor communication among members of the care team

Solution: Share the same documents, do not reinvent the wheel, and include one another in your correspondence.

 

Various sets of expectations by multiple Power of Attorneys or children can set the stage for disagreement.  Sometimes these conflicting actors may not even agree with the diagnosis and subsequently, how to best care for the client.  It is important to remember, the focus should be on the well-being of the client.

  • Disagreement on the diagnosis and expectations of care

Solution: When you talk to your siblings and family, focus your conversation on how to best support your loved one.  It is about them, not about you.  If you want to rule out other possible diagnoses, consult specialists, but consider the impact it has on the quality of life of the older adult.

 

A stable schedule helps the older adult build a routine and encourages the same carepartner(s) to work with client over the medium and long-term.  When schedules change often, so does the daily routine.  It also has consequences for the care team.  We cannot guarantee that the same carepartners will return to your care team if the schedule is interrupted regularly.

  • Erratic schedule changes

Solution: Make a commitment to choose a realistic schedule that allows your loved one to form a relationship with their carepartners.  This allows the plan of care to be executed successfully.  The minimum amount of service for clients with the least needs is usually three to five days per week, of at least four hours each assignment.    

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Carepartners work through role play scenarios with dementia coaches and practitioners

NursePartners practices the Positive Physical Approach to CareTM as developed by Teepa Snow and her team.  Each client living with dementia is classified by a GEM stone.  The characteristics of these GEM stones, along with the client’s personality and unique life experiences, dictate our approach.

All carepartners are trained to connect before providing care.  Simply put, we find this the most effective method.  Too often, carepartners push forth their agenda without enough emphasis on how it is affecting the client.  The mentality is to complete the “to do” list as soon as possible.

Unfortunately, older adults are not always moving at our speed.  If they are living with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, the situation becomes even more complicated.  The older adult may not realize what we are trying to do, even though these actions are intended to assist them.  When we rush to complete tasks, this can lead to unfavorable outcomes.  If we provide care before connecting, this can increase anxiety, depression, or lead to aggression.

All carepartners are trained in the Positive Physical Approach to CareTM methodology.  During orientation, carepartners work with dementia coaches and practitioners as they role play challenging scenarios.  We want carepartners to be prepared for all types of situations.

Carepartners are trained to put their agenda away and go with the flow.  They focus on connecting before rushing to provide care.  This simple investment of time pays dividends in the long run as a meaningful relationship is developed between the carepartner and the client.  The result is that the client becomes more receptive to receiving care.

In this video, Denise encounters a client actor (dementia coach) who is non-verbal and fixated on a task.  Instead of demanding that the client focus on her, she engages him in his task first.  She continues to have a conversation, even though he does not respond to her.

When it is time to perform the caregiving task, Denise is patient as the client stands up.  She respects his independence and does not rush to do everything for him.  Denise helps explain how to get up and helps stabilize his gait during the process.

As he stands, she lightens the mood with movement and rhythm.  Music and rhythm are deeply engrained in our brains and is one of the best ways to connect with someone living with dementia.  Carepartners that employ this preserved skill are more likely to succeed than those who do not.

Would you like to learn more about GEM care services or want to join our team?  Call us today at 610-323-9800.

Click to the link to see the full video:

Denise demonstrates the Positive Physical Approach to Care

 

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Denise uses the Positive Physical Approach to Care to guide non-verbal client

Study to evaluate the impact of a cancer fighting drug on slowing neurodegenerative disease progression

This NPR article discusses how Nilotinib seems to work by eliminating toxic proteins that build up in the brains of people with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The drug seems to activate a mechanism in brain cells that acts like a sort of garbage disposal.  Read the entire article on NRP.

Currently Georgetown University is looking for participants for a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the impact of low doses of a cancer fighting drug on slowing the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Learn more about the study.

NursePartners does not advocate for any specific type of medication.  Our holistic approach seeks to connect before providing care.  For clients with advanced forms of dementia, we explore different ways to say hello and communicate.

Our carepartners follow the Teepa Snow’s positive physical approach to dementia care.  Through extensive training, carepartners learn how to deescalate situations and build meaningful relationships with our clients.  We do not promote a purely medicated method for working with clients living with dementia.